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Tiffany is a labour and employment lawyer with a passion and natural predisposition for practical problem-solving. Tiffany’s goal is to provide legal services in an approachable and accessible way. She aims to ensure that whatever the legal problem, her client understands the legal complexities and nuances and the solution to the problem.

Attention employers and job seekers! As a result of some incoming changes to the Employment Standards Act, job postings are about to look different!

Ontario’s Working For Workers Four Act received Royal Assent on March 21, 2024. And now, a brief interlude on Ontario’s law-making process in case you’ve forgotten: Royal Assent is the last step in the process that makes a Bill law.Continue Reading Attention Employers: Legal Changes Coming to Job Posting Requirements 

As lawyers who practice for both employers and employees, we know that terminations are rarely pleasant for anyone involved.

After all, as the Courts have acknowledged, employment is an essential component of identity, self-worth and emotional well-being. More recent Court rulings have reminded us that the manner in which employment can be terminated is equally

There has been no shortage of high-profile workplace investigations and discussions surrounding the outcome of those investigations in the news over the past year. But what happens when you’re no longer reading about the investigation in the news and you’re suddenly at the center of one in your workplace? 

Whether you’re an employer who is

Earlier today we learned that Sam Altman, CEO of OpenAI the company behind ChatGPT, was returning to his post as CEO, bringing a captivating story to a close (well at least for now).

In case you missed it, the company dismissed Altman on Friday. The company provided few details on its decision to terminate Altman beyond citing a lack of candour on his part when communicating with its Board.Continue Reading Learning from OpenAI’s Pitfalls: Termination Ripple Effects

At a time when our civil justice system is plagued by extreme delay, I am grateful to practice law in an area that is well known for its focus on creative and practical problem-solving and settling, as opposed to litigating disputes. There are certainly some labour and employment disputes which simply must be litigated, but the majority of disputes will ultimately be settled. There are many reasons why settlement is often an attractive option (the delay and cost of litigation, the peace of mind a settlement can bring, and avoiding the disruption and harm that litigation can cause to a business or its reputation …just to name a few) but in this blog we will provide some tips for considering, understanding and implementing legal settlements.Continue Reading Approaching, Understanding and Implementing Legal Settlements 

This is the second entry in our blog that focuses on the topic of labour law. In case you missed it, the first entry provided a primer on managing a unionized workplace and you can find it here.

In this blog, we provide some practical tips and tricks for unionized employers to navigate the grievance process.

Conflicts in a unionized workplace are almost always addressed through the grievance process. What constitutes a grievance is typically defined by the collective agreement. A grievance is typically defined as any dispute, difference or complaint regarding the application, interpretation or alleged violation of the collective agreement. The parties to the grievance, that is the parties who are entitled to file and respond to a grievance are usually also outlined by the collective agreement. Beyond defining a grievance, the collective agreement will typically also outline the grievance process.Continue Reading Addressing Conflicts in Unionized Workplace: The Grievance Process

Update Employment Contracts Following Substantial Changes to the Job

With St. Patrick’s Day having just passed, many of us start to bank on luck at this time of the year. While luck might get you to the end of the rainbow on some things, we wouldn’t recommend that you lean on luck when it comes to non-existent, outdated or incomplete employment contracts. 

The Consequences of Leaving it up to Luck

First, in case you’re new here or need a quick refresher, employment contracts are often recommended by lawyers and adopted by employers to bring a level of certainty to the employment relationship. Employment contracts can achieve a variety of things but generally, they set out the responsibilities and expectations of the employee and employer. If the employment relationship is bound by provincial employment standards legislation (it usually is), then the contract has to, at the very least, uphold the minimum standards of the applicable legislation. 

If your employment contract runs afoul of the applicable employment standards legislation by failing to uphold the minimum standards as required by the law, your contract could be deemed unenforceable. Contracts could also be found to be unenforceable if they fail to comply with the principles of contract law. Continue Reading Don’t Leave it to Luck: Update Employment Contracts Following Substantial Changes to the Job