Last week, I conducted a workshop on implementing a successful “Bring Your Own Device” (BYOD) program at the Canadian Institute’s Privacy Law & Compliance Conference.  I met a wonderful group of privacy experts who had plenty to contribute to the discussion.

We talked about the benefits, risks and costs of permitting employees to use their personal device to perform work-related tasks, which typically includes accessing the company’s network.  Over half the group was in the public sector and regularly handled very sensitive, confidential personal information.

The private sector attendees in the group had an equally strong concern about protecting highly sensitive and confidential business information.  At the end of the day, most organizations, regardless of how open they may or may not be, require a certain level of security around their data, intellectual property and personal information.

So how to implement a successful BYOD program?


Continue Reading Implementing a Successful BYOD Program

A couple of readers have asked to what extent US based social media cases will apply in Canada.  We don’t yet have a large body of social media cases in Canada (other than run of the mill termination cases involving social media), so there tends to be a lot of discussion up here about US

Employees often take work-related data with them when they resign or are terminated from employment.  In many cases, it is an inadvertent act that has happened over time by using their own device or email account to work after hours.

Emily Chung, technology writer from CBC News interviewed me and wrote the following piece, exploring the issue:

Privacy and Porn on Workplace ComputersEmployees have a reasonable expectation of privacy in the personal information on their workplace computers, even if that expectation can be significantly diminished with effective workplace policies and practices.  However, whether such reasonable expectations extend to workplace computer evidence admitted in a criminal proceeding was addressed in last Friday’s highly anticipated Supreme Court of Canada

As of today, individuals can now sue for the tort of privacy in Ontario.   (Thanks to Professor Doorey for the heads up in a tweet and blog post this afternoon).

The new tort is based on the following statement:

One who intentionally intrudes, physically or otherwise, upon the seclusion of another or his or her

Privacy in the workplace is an area that invites a broad range of views and perspectives.  Whether the information relates to data on an electronic device such as an employer-provided computer or blackberry, or personal employee information such as bank account information for pay cheque deposits, we all expect some degree of privacy in the