Earlier today we learned that Sam Altman, CEO of OpenAI the company behind ChatGPT, was returning to his post as CEO, bringing a captivating story to a close (well at least for now).

In case you missed it, the company dismissed Altman on Friday. The company provided few details on its decision to terminate Altman beyond citing a lack of candour on his part when communicating with its Board.Continue Reading Learning from OpenAI’s Pitfalls: Termination Ripple Effects

Proposed new job posting requirements regarding AI disclosure

The Ontario government recently introduced Bill 149 – Working for Workers Act, 2023 which includes planned amendments to the rules regarding job postings in the Employment Standards Act. The planned amendments include a requirement that employers disclose the use of artificial intelligence (“AI”) in the hiring process.  The specific language proposed for this amendment in Bill 149 is as follows:

Every employer who advertises a publicly advertised job posting and who uses artificial intelligence to screen, assess or select applicants for the position shall include in the posting a statement disclosing the use of the artificial intelligence.Continue Reading AI in the Hiring Process – Legislative Changes and Risks for Employers to Consider

On November 1, 2023 British Columbia’s new Pay Transparency Act (“Act”) took effect, which requires employers throughout British Columbia to post expected salary ranges for job postings. Notably, as explained by the British Columbia government in a guidance document, this requirement will also apply to postings for remote positions if the position is open to candidates in British Columbia, among other locations. 

British Columbia is now the second province in Canada with such legislation in effect following Prince Edward Island in 2022. Ontario may also follow suit with the Minister of Labour, Immigration, Training and Skills Development recently announcing the intent to introduce legislation next week regarding pay transparency. As details emerge and if the legislation progresses toward becoming law in Ontario, we will keep you informed.Continue Reading British Columbia Becomes The Second Province with Pay Transparency Legislation

On October 26, 2023, the Working for Workers Act, 2023(the “Act”), the Ontario government’s third iteration of this legislation aimed at protecting workers,  received Royal Assent and came into force. The Act introduces amendments to several employment-related statutes, impacting employers across the province. Below are some of the most relevant amendments. 

Mass Terminations Under the ESA:

One of the most notable changes introduced by the Act is the expansion of the definition of an employer’s “establishment” under the Employment Standards Act, 2000 (“ESA”). This expansion now includes the private residences of employees who work from home. As a result, employers must take these employees into account when assessing mass terminations. Mass terminations occur when 50 or more employees are terminated within the employer’s “establishment” in a four-week period.Continue Reading Ontario’s Working for Workers Act, 2023: Key Changes Affecting Employers

In Ontario, employers must abide by the Occupational Health and Safety Act (OHSA) to ensure the safety of their workplace and workers. One legal requirement under OHSA that we often get questions about is an employer’s obligations around Joint Health and Safety Committees (JHSC). Here are some practical tips for employers to meet these obligations. Continue Reading Practical Tips on How Employers Can Meet Their Joint Health and Safety Committee Obligations

Receiving notice to bargain can be overwhelming for an employer, especially if it is to negotiate a first collective agreement. It is important to understand key steps in the process in order to be prepared to achieve the best outcome for your business. 

Do not feel rushed 

There is no need to immediately schedule bargaining sessions once you receive notice to bargain. The obligation is to commence bargaining within a reasonable time frame such that the employer is not interfering with the union’s right to collective bargaining. Understandably, it could take up to a few months to align schedules of the bargaining teams on both sides and to ensure adequate time for preparation. Continue Reading “You’ve been served with notice to bargain, now what?” 

At a time when our civil justice system is plagued by extreme delay, I am grateful to practice law in an area that is well known for its focus on creative and practical problem-solving and settling, as opposed to litigating disputes. There are certainly some labour and employment disputes which simply must be litigated, but the majority of disputes will ultimately be settled. There are many reasons why settlement is often an attractive option (the delay and cost of litigation, the peace of mind a settlement can bring, and avoiding the disruption and harm that litigation can cause to a business or its reputation …just to name a few) but in this blog we will provide some tips for considering, understanding and implementing legal settlements.Continue Reading Approaching, Understanding and Implementing Legal Settlements 

Employers often state that promoting DEIB initiatives is a top priority, and they ask us how best to improve on the start they’ve made (or how to get on board in a meaningful way for the first time). For those less versed in this space, DEIB stands for Diversity, Equity, Inclusion and Belonging. The ‘belonging’ component is a more recent addition to the acronym. According to Gallup, in a ‘culture of belonging’ employees are appreciated for what they bring to the group, there is a genuine desire for meaningful relationships, and there is an appreciation for the differences between people. In addition to leading to a happier workplace, it’s no surprise that fostering a culture of belonging makes good business sense. Gallup found that if more employees believed that their opinions counted, “organizations could reduce turnover by as much as 27%, safety incidents by 40%, and increase productivity by 12%.”Continue Reading Respect in the Workplace Policies: An Employer’s Starting Point for DEIB Initiatives

According to Statistics Canada, in 2023 20% of Canadian workers reported that they “usually” work from home. This is a significant jump from the pre-pandemic numbers, with only 7% of workers reporting that they usually worked from home in 2016.

Many employers now are trying to figure out how to move forward with working arrangements for their employees in the post-pandemic world- fully remote? Fully in-person? A hybrid of both? 

If your business has employees working remotely, whether all the time or some of the time, there are certain employment law issues you should consider as remote work becomes a more permanent and prevalent part of the employment landscape. Continue Reading Potential Employment Law Issues When Managing a Remote or Hybrid Workforce 

Accommodating employees with disabilities and medical issues is an integral part of creating an inclusive and equitable workplace. But what should an employer do if they receive a request for accommodation that does not provide enough information? How can we balance an employee’s right to privacy with an employer’s need for sufficient information to assess an accommodation request?Continue Reading Navigating Disability Accommodation Requests: Balancing Privacy and Information